U.S. food companies caught faking blueberries
with artificial colors and liquid sugars,
reveals Health Ranger investigation


Wednesday, January 19, 2011
by Mike Adams, the Health Ranger
Editor of NaturalNews.com

(NaturalNews)

Learn more

A Food Investigations mini-documentary released today exposes the "blueberry deception" in name-brand cereals, bagels, breads and bars. As revealed in the investigative video, big-name food companies that offer blueberry cereals, muffins, pastries and bars have been caught "faking" the blueberries by creating them out of artificial colors, partially-hydrogenated oils and high fructose corn syrup (HFCS).

This investigation was conducted by award-winning investigative journalist Mike Adams, the Health Ranger, as part of the non-profit Consumer Wellness Center which provides nutrition grants for children's education programs around the world. The non-profit "blueberry deception" video can be viewed in its entirety at www.FoodInvestigations.com Total cereal called "Total fraud"

Named in the video are Kellogg's, Target, Betty Crocker, General Mills and other food companies that use artificial colors to create the illusion of real blueberries in their products. One General Mills cereal singled out in the mini-documentary is called Total Blueberry Pomegranate Cereal. But a Consumer Wellness Center investigation reveals that this cereal contains neither blueberries nor pomegranates.

Source: General Mills website nutrition facts label

The cereal does, however, contain an astonishing 8 different sweeteners: Sugar, Corn Syrup, Barley Malt Extract, Brown Sugar Syrup, Malt Syrup, Sucralose, Molasses and Honey. The front label of the Total cereal box claims "100% Nutrition."

After investigating the real ingredients of Total cereal, Mike Adams called the product a "total fraud." He added, "It's clear to me that General Mills is deceptively marketing Total Blueberry Pomegranate cereal by trying to deceive consumers into believing it contains both blueberries and pomegranates - two foods that are gaining a reputation as healthy ingredients in the minds of consumers."

"If consumers don't read the ingredients label, they may be easily misled into believing they are purchasing a cereal containing health-enhancing blueberries and pomegranates, when in reality they are buying sugared-up grains promoted with shamelessly deceptive marketing," said Mike Adams, the Health Ranger, who researched, scripted and narrated the Food Investigations episode.

General Mills, however, isn't the only big-name food company called out in the shocking video documentary. Several other companies are also exposed in the mini-documentary available for viewing at FoodInvestigations.com

How to avoid fake blueberries in food products

As explained in the video, consumers can avoid being deceived by food companies by following these three simple steps:

#1) Read the ingredients labels and look for artificial colors such as Red #40, Blue #1 and Blue #2. They are usually found near the end of the ingredients list.

#2) Don't buy foods made with artificial colors because the purpose of those colors is to cosmetically alter the appearance of those foods to make them appear more visually stimulating in order to "trick" or influence the consumer's purchasing decisions. When eating blueberry-colored cereals or pastries, many consumers actually believe they're eating real blueberries, even though no blueberries whatsoever may be used in the making of the product.

#3) Don't let your kids eat foods with artificial colors. At least one artificial color has been linked to symptoms of ADHD. Artificial colors are derived from coal tars and several colors have been banned in the past few decades due to human health hazards.

Furthermore, you can refuse to buy products from companies that use artificial colors. These include all the major cereal companies and mainstream food producers.

Artificial colors are also widely used in processed meats where the ingredient known as "sodium nitrite" is actually a red color fixer that gives dead, putrid-looking meat a fresh red appearance. Sodium nitrite, which is found in nearly all mainstream hot dogs, lunch meats, ham products, bacon, sausage and jerky products, is linked to alarming increases in risks of pancreatic cancer, color cancer and even brain tumors in children.

Real blueberries are great for you!

Adams believes it is important to emphasize that real blueberries are very good for human health. "Real blueberries offer a powerhouse of health-enhancing nutrition. They protect arteries, health lower blood pressure and provide an assortment of natural antioxidants to protect the eyes, brain and nervous system," Adams says.

Blueberries are also known to help prevent cancer, boost memory and even help reduce belly fat.

Watch for more food investigations from consumer health advocate Mike Adams, the Health Ranger, at www.FoodInvestigations.com

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